SpeakMe

A toolkit for the identification and support
of learners exhibiting literacy difficulties

Reporting

Reporting
 

All those involved in reporting on the identification and assessment process should be clear about their use of language and avoid terms such as ‘tendencies’ or ‘signs’ which can potentially be confusing for pupils and parents. The Scottish Government definition should allow for a pupil either being dyslexic or not, but to what extent will vary along the continuum.

Where dyslexic difficulties are not presenting a significant barrier to learning, or where exploration is still in the early stages, reporting to parents/carers may be done orally at the initial stages though clear records should be maintained of the child's progress and support. There are a number of ways in which understandings may be shared and reported - for example:

  • At parents' evenings
  • Through collaboration with colleagues
  • Through routine pupil reports
  • By means of pupil profiles
  • And any other routine means of dissemination that are used in school.

The specific means will vary from school to school - but it is vital that information is shared regularly and transparently throughout an assessment process that is fully collaborative. The young person should be at the centre of every stage and aspect of the process of assessment and reporting.

Irrespective of severity and stage of the progress, Staged Intervention paperwork should be completed, highlighting:

  • clear notes on the teaching approaches and strategies put in place
  • child/young person’s involvement
  • assessment of progress made
  • planning. 

All records of this nature should be communicated between classes and schools.

As highlighted throughout this toolkit, assessing for dyslexic difficulties should be a collaborative process which involves staff parents/carers, colleagues and the learner as fully as possible at every stage of the process. If carrying out assessments for dyslexia, the parents/carers and the young person (if old enough) should be informed.

Where dyslexia has been identified as a barrier to learning, information will continue to be shared through Parents’ Evenings and other routine information-sharing mechanisms.

Reporting ranges from:

  • Classroom teachers reports – assessment is for learning
  • Maintaining regular contact with parents/carers over any concerns at Step 1 through to more continuous and detailed sharing of insights at Step 2.
  • A full assessment and report at Step 3, which collates and interprets all the available data and insights into an analysis/summary/report that should be helpful and informative to all those involved in helping the pupil to cope with school and post school if applicable.

Important factors to consider when reporting

  • All reporting has to be done sensitively as it is important not to convey either stress or worry to parents and pupil
  • Include the strengths of the learner
  • Parents and carers must be treated respectfully as partners
  • Maintain clear records of the progress of all children
  • Support collaboration on what is done in school and what is done to support the school work at home. Ensure any ‘home work’ is engaging and appropriate.
  • Highlight supports in place
  • Include recommendations/next steps
  • All learning and teaching approaches and strategies that have been used should be recorded in the Staged Process paperwork/establishing needs form.

Parents/carers should be:

  • Aware of any information that is held in paper form – including assessments  
  • Fully aware of what is happening
  • Included in deciding the best approaches and strategies to be adopted. This needs to be dealt with in a sensitive way to avoid any possible over-reaction and distress to either parents/carers or the pupil. Be aware and sensitive that the concern and distress will be real and may be justified. 

Curriculum Level Reporting


Common types of Reporting


Early

  • Informal, oral, child’s personal learning plan. Home/school jotter.

First, Second, Third , Fourth and  Senior

  • Ongoing and sometimes informal arrangements at Step 1 through to more continuous and detailed sharing of insights at Step 2, and a comprehensive formal report at Step 3, which collates and interprets all the available data and insights into an analysis/summary/report that should be helpful and informative to all those involved with this learner.
  • Ensure there is good communication between staff in nursery and school and that records are shared.   
     
  • Maintain clear and regular communication with parents/carers. Discussions with parents may reveal a family history of difficulties which warrant further investigation. Caution will also be required as children will only be in the very early stages of developing literacy and may just be slower to acquire skills than others in their peer group. This will not prevent focused intervention and additional support if progress is slow, and the child's response to intervention monitored closely and adapted as appropriate.
  • Ensure there is good communication between staff in school and that pupil profiles/records are shared.  
     
  • Maintain clear and regular communication with parents/carers. Discussions with parents may reveal a family history of difficulties which warrant further investigation or other factors which may impact on the child’s language development.
     
  • Highlight transition support and progress.
  • Ensure there is good communication between staff in school and that pupil profiles/records are shared.  
     
  • Share SQA Assessment Arrangements – this will also include support for course work.
     
  • Share post school transition advice.